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‘Inadequate, weak, too old for fighting’ – the criminals humiliated in public


As well as revealing their punishment, judges often give criminals some cutting home truths.

Over the past year judges in Manchester have branded criminals as ‘inadequate’, ‘arrogant’ and ‘very weak’.

After outlining the facts of the case and explaining how they came to their decision, judges often take the opportunity to tell defendants exactly how it is.

Here are some of the best put-downs Manchester’s judges delivered to criminals in the last 12 months.

“You are an inadequate man who cannot cope with the reality of having reached your fifties without ever really achieving much…”



Tony Eckersley

‘Keyboard warrior’ Tony Eckersley bombarded a female MP with hundreds of ‘hate filled’ messages.

Eckersley, 52, from Salford, sent threatening messages and racial slurs to Birmingham MP Jess Phillips, as well as calling her a ‘c***’ and a ‘treasonous cow’.

He also suggested it would be ‘appropriate’ for her and other MPs to be victims of a terrorist attack in the House of Commons.

At court Eckersley claimed he had a defence under ‘freedom of expression’.

Eckersley was jailed for 28 months after pleading guilty to an offence of putting another in fear of violence by racially aggravated harassment.

Sentencing, Judge Hilary Manley delivered a withering assessment of Eckersley, who had accused Ms Phillips of having him ‘shut down, like so many other British heroes’.

Judge Manley told him: “What you do, in indulging in such a campaign, does not make you a hero and it does not protect or help a single other person.

“You are an inadequate man who cannot cope with the reality of having reached your fifties without ever really achieving much, save for acquiring some criminal convictions for violent and abusive behaviour, and a habit of drinking too much alcohol and sitting at your keyboard, venting your frustration at others who in your view have the temerity to put themselves in positions of public service and to hold views with which you do not agree.”

“That was just a lie. You were given the opportunity to change, you didn’t.”



Aaron Sutton

A judge slammed paedophile Aaron Sutton for ‘lying to him’ and ‘fooling’ the probation service.

Sutton had been given a chance and was spared jail after being found with indecent images of children.

As part of his sentence Sutton, 22, had to attend court and have his progress reviewed by a judge.

But at the same time as he was claiming to be complying, Sutton was actually having ‘highly sexualised’ chats with a child.

Sutton had been ‘fooling’ the probation service, and he had lied to him, Judge Anthony Cross QC said.

“I was assured by the probation service and by you that you were responding to the terms of the order,” the judge said.

“That was just a lie. You were given the opportunity to change, you didn’t.

“You were lying to yourself, lying to the probation service, lying to your father and lying to me.

“Because during the course of the suspended sentence order, you struck up a relationship with a 12-year-old child in foster care.

“She was vulnerable, and you committed offences against her.

“She had a terrible personal history, and you have made her condition worse, much worse.”

He was jailed for three-and-a-half years.

“All of this shows that you are an arrogant young man, who was trying to assert his authority on the court, and believes that he is superior to others.”



Oliver Bel

Cambridge graduate Oliver Bel was jailed for a terrorism offence after being found to have a document containing instructions on how to make a bomb.

Bel, who posted vile racist hate online, described homosexuality as ‘perverse’ and in a WhatsApp chat said ‘kill all n******’.

Bel, 24, who has been diagnosed with Asperger’s syndrome, was branded as ‘highly manipulative’ by a judge, who claimed he can ‘ ‘exploit’ his condition ‘when it suits’.

Bel refused to wear a face mask in line with coronavirus rules at the start of his trial, but complied after the judge said he may withdraw his bail and remand him in custody.

He had said it was his ‘human right’ not to wear a mask, then claimed wearing one would affect his health.

“Photographs recovered from your phone showed you wearing a Nazi type mask quite happily,” the judge said.

“All of this shows that you are an arrogant young man, who was trying to assert his authority on the court, and believes that he is superior to others.”

Bel was jailed for two years.

“You have been involved in weight training and weight lifting but you are a very weak man.”



Alireza Herefedoust was branded a ‘very weak man’

A weightlifting champion nicknamed the ‘The Strength Predator’ was labelled a ‘very weak man’ after subjecting his girlfriend to a controlling and abusive relationship.

Alireza Herefedoust, 34, bullied, belittled and terrorised the 21-year-old woman, who he had been coaching.

After meeting online, Herefedoust became possessive and accused her of being a ‘liar and a cheat’, after seeing old messages she had sent to another man.

Herefedoust persuaded her to stay after they had an argument. She packed her bags after another row but stayed after he threatened to kill himself.

Police were called to his apartment in Hulme on another occasion after he smashed up her mobile phone.

During the incident he held a piece of the broken screen to her throat, after waking up to find her trying to sneak out of the flat.

Sentencing, Judge Suzanne Goddard QC told him: “You have been involved in weight training and weight lifting but you are a very weak man.

“You do not see yourself in the same light particularly against the victims of your violent, bullying and controlling behaviour. I think you have a long way to go before you behave like a proper decent man.”

Herefedoust admitted coercive behaviour and received a 10 month prison sentence suspended for two years.

“I was tempted at one point to call it childish behaviour, but it is unlikely, frankly, that any child would behave quite so badly.”



Marcillo Sarr

It was a shocking road rage attack in the street.

After a row over who had right of way on a road in Ancoats, Marcillo Sarr produced an axe and smashed Stephen Bradley’s windscreen with the weapon.

Bradley then pulled out the axe which had become lodged in his windscreen, and used it to attack Sarr’s car.

Sarr had been driving his blue Citroen towards Bradley on the wrong way of a one-way street.

They both got out of their cars and had an argument before Sarr produced the foot long axe.

“I was tempted at one point to call it childish behaviour, but it is unlikely, frankly, that any child would behave quite so badly,” Judge Patrick Field QC said.

The judge said if it wasn’t for the ‘risky and dangerous behaviour’, the incident could have been ‘the stuff of situational comedy’.

Sarr, 45, of Brynorme Road, Crumpsall, pleaded guilty to affray, having a bladed article and criminal damage.

Bradley, 32, of Debenham Avenue, Newton Heath, admitted criminal damage.

“At 44-years-old, you’re really too old to behave like this, you must surely have better things to do with your time.”



Thomas Joyce

Thomas Joyce was brought before a judge after being caught on footage of an organised fight within the traveller community.

Joyce was seen throwing punches in a YouTube video of two other men fighting.

Police were investigating an organised fight two families from the travelling community which descended into an ‘unedifying’ fracas.

Others including Joyce were seen to get involved and throw punches on a basketball court in Middleton.

“Mr Joyce played a relatively minor role and has been out of trouble for many years,” his barrister Daniel Travers said.

“There have been some difficulties in the travelling community.”

The court heard Joyce has been asked by officers to help in ‘calming the situation’ as he has influence ‘on both sides’.

Joyce, 44, pleaded guilty to an offence of section 4 public order, namely using threatening, abusive or insulting words or behaviour and was fined £500.

Sentencing, Judge Manley said: “You took part in some organised violence between two groups of people, you threw some punches.

“It was an unedifying spectacle, really.

“At 44-years-old, you’re really too old to behave like this, you must surely have better things to do with your time.

“You’re not setting a good example for the young men in your community.”





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